Last is part game and part sound toy. The play is divided into two sections. First, you and your partner create backstories for each other and then spend time working to build your relationship together. Where did you meet? How did you fall in love? Wait, did you fall in love? Why? What has kept you together this long? After this initial relationship deepening, you play as a couple who has been together a long time (however long you’ve decided that is) who are on their weekly date at a cafe. You use the diegetic elements of the cafe where you have your weekly coffee date (the tapping of your fingers on the table, the monotonous conversation, the stirring of drinks) to created noises and hopefully find a rhythm that is comfortable and enjoyable for both you and your partner. You also have control over when you decide to say something during your conversation as well as what tone you use to say it. It is up to you whether you decide to use this experience to literally create a rhythmic sound experience, or whether you find the rhythm of your conversation and your relationship.  This prototype was made by Allison Cole, Jessica Rose Marcotte, Zachary Miller and Drew Pascoe.

Last is part game and part sound toy. The play is divided into two sections. First, you and your partner create backstories for each other and then spend time working to build your relationship together. Where did you meet? How did you fall in love? Wait, did you fall in love? Why? What has kept you together this long?

After this initial relationship deepening, you play as a couple who has been together a long time (however long you’ve decided that is) who are on their weekly date at a cafe. You use the diegetic elements of the cafe where you have your weekly coffee date (the tapping of your fingers on the table, the monotonous conversation, the stirring of drinks) to created noises and hopefully find a rhythm that is comfortable and enjoyable for both you and your partner. You also have control over when you decide to say something during your conversation as well as what tone you use to say it. It is up to you whether you decide to use this experience to literally create a rhythmic sound experience, or whether you find the rhythm of your conversation and your relationship. 

This prototype was made by Allison Cole, Jessica Rose Marcotte, Zachary Miller and Drew Pascoe.